Oh my dear heart

  

  
The singular and cheerful life
of any flower
in anyone’s garden
or any still unowned field-

if there are any-
catches me
by the heart,
by its color

by its obedience
to the holiest of laws:
be alive
until you are not.

Those princes of everything green-
the grasses
of which there are truly
an uncountable company,

each on its singular stem
striving
to rise and ripen.

What, in the earth world,
is there not to be amazed by
and to be steadied by
and to cherish?

Oh, my dear heart,
my own dear heart,
full of hesitations,
questions, choice of directions,

look at the world.
Behold the morning glory,
the meanest flower, the ragweed, the thistle.
Look at the grass.

– Mary Oliver

Mothers Day

My first Mothers Day as an actual mum! Would liked to spend the day at home cuddling my teething daughter and watching The Night Manager on catch-up. But alas we are piled into the car and getting lost in West London, spectacularly late for lunch.  

Review: Nora Webster by Colm T贸ib铆n

Nora WebsterNora Webster by Colm T贸ib铆n

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

What a master Colm T贸ib铆n is. This novel feels restrained and understated, like its heroine – an astonishing thing, when you consider that T贸ib铆n is writing about a woman plunged into grief. At times I wanted T贸ib铆n to show us her turmoil, to give us some angst or emotion at least, but he holds back. And strangely this makes the story better and ultimately more moving. As the story moves forward it grows in a quiet power, like laying down layers of sediment until the weight of it rests on your mind long after you’ve finished reading.

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Defining Beauty at the British Museum

Just a quick review and some thoughts on ‘Defining Beauty’, which is currently on at the British Museum in London. We went a couple of weekends ago, and I聽loved it.

Firstly, from the moment you聽walk in聽to the聽exhibition you know you’re in for a treat. The show’s focus is the聽body in ancient Greek art, and I like聽that what greets聽you straight away is not some full-frontal, muscled athlete, but the naked derri猫re聽of Aphrodite聽herself. It’s as if we’ve stumbled clumsily into her presence,聽catching her in her聽graceful crouch, her head turned at the sound of our footfall.聽It’s an arresting, totally entrancing start to the show.

Marble statue of a naked Aphrodite crouching at her bath, also known as Lely鈥檚 Venus. Roman copy of a Greek original, 2nd century AD
Marble statue of a naked Aphrodite crouching at her bath, also known as Lely鈥檚 Venus. Roman copy of a Greek original, 2nd century AD

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